Flow Contemporary Arts is now a company!

I’m delighted to announce that Flow Contemporary Arts is now a registered company. And we’re open for business!!

This development will mean we can expand our offer and deliver contracts for others as well as initiate our own. Starting off with a small, but perfectly formed, Board of Directors, Flow will be in a better position for fundraising and available to clients to lead on a range of projects. The Directors – namely Grace Davies and Claire Gulliver – will inform and support the development of the Company.

They bring an excellent range of experience, knowledge and skills to the table – Grace as ex-director of Visual Arts South West and now Contemporary Arts Programme Manager, National Trust; and Claire as a founder member of New Expressions and co-producer of the Bideford Black Project.

Exciting times ahead – if you want to discuss any new projects with us get in touch – we look forward to working on new things together.

Flow Contemporary Arts Registered company no. 10498277

Call for host venues for The Story of Objects – the next phase – workshops

 

SOO yellow bar logo longJust a quick note to get you thinking over the weekend – I’m looking for hosts for the next phase of the Story of Objects – maybe it’s you?

The Story of Objects to date has very much been about ‘show and tell’ sessions, for research purposes.  The overarching vision – to create a social media network for things – is still underpinning all activity. However, the encounters have been rich and rewarding for many people.

One set of themes that came up again and again were inherited objects from family members that  relate to making or creating something. All sorts of tools and materials, artefacts and childhood memories.

I’ve been exploring how to work with the stories you’ve shared with me – there are the 30second shorts on Youtube; the Flash Fiction pieces on Medium and even a Story of Cake! The Facebook page shares news about the projects and also about other interesting object-stories from around the world – all food for thought.

The next phase will involve workshops – and I invite you to contact me if you’d like to discuss this for your organisation. I’m shaping the programme now and have some great ideas developing from the conversations so far. Each partner/collaborator is welcome to get in touch now to explore how the framework can work for you and your audiences. It is currently flexible and adaptable, which is another of features and benefits of the programme structure.

If appropriate, where a making activity is not right for the object theme, there will be an option to book a talk/presentation by a practitioner or specialist for the subject area.

I’d love to hear from arts organisations, museums, heritage organisations, material culture people, ethnographers, archaeologists and historians. Also, studios for woodworking, metal working, potteries, forges, printmaking studios, musical instrument workshops, anyone who makes – oo, and I may need a chef too!

Get in touch by email (carolyn@fkowprojects.org.uk), phone or message me via the Facebook page.

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Art in Gloucestershire – is it our turn? Drones in Cheltenham?

There was  a launch for ‘Surveillance’, a new work by Patrick Lowry, at the HardwIck Gallery in Cheltenham yesterday.  There was a great reading by Clare Thornton and talks by Chris Woods, author of Sudden Justice: America’s Secret Drone Wars and Theo Price of COBRA.

This is the second exhibition I’ve been to see in 2016 (I did sneak in Localism at MIMA on the cusp!). Both have been in Cheltenham  – the other was the Artist Rooms on Tour show of three works by Bill Viola at The Wilson, along with the Jerwood Drawing Show.

It’s tempting to present a critical review of these shows, they certainly merit one as they are excellent, but that’s not what motivates me to write today – I’m more interested in the rise of visual arts activity in my county. Gloucestershire has always been a poor neighbour to Bristol, Cardiff and Birmingham – stuck in the middle with poor rail networks and bridge crossing charges for the many that have to drive to get here.

So seeing Localism in Middlesbrough (5.5 hours on a train to get there!!!) prompted me to make more effort to see local work – whizzing off to Venice, London, Oxford, Bruton etc. is great, but it is even more special when things locally get exciting. And in the past year there’s definitely been a lift.

Is Gloucestershire finally getting a rich mix of input, layered on top of an already buzzing community of artists that often worked under the radar (probably because there were no places to see work so they show elsewhere- they have to)? Stroud has SVA, and Prema up in the Cotswolds is fab, but Gloucester, Forest of Dean and Cheltenham are poorly served in terms of venues.Last summer Blackrock rolled into town – a Matts Gallery show hosted in Lydney. Bruce Allen from Blakeney has been touring Difference Screen a fantastic mix of international films for 2 years, literally worldwide. There are many more individuals I could mention, this is the tip of the iceberg.

I live here, I want to see things happen within driving distance. Gloucester has always lacked visual arts presence, there are several  Open Studios happening around the county too – we need to join forces more, connect up, amplify big time.

So go and see what we have, celebrate it as I am doing , make living here just as exciting as the cities – rural is good too – I’d say better – we don’t need parking permits to visit and we get to breathe fresh air and peacefulness!

It is wonderful to see work that questions drone activity in war zones in the same city as GCHQ – why weren’t there more people there? This art is raising important conversations in a city that employs military specialists – how can we invite them to come?

Local MP’s, Councillors, human rights activists – PLEASE come and see this show.

And add Visual Arts South West (VASW) to your favourite websites, join their mailing list, find out what is happening here on your doorstep.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At 6pm performance artist Clare Thornton will be reading from drone operator transcripts.

 

 

 

The Story of Objects is now on Medium – do share yours

The more I talk to people about the Story of Objects project, the more I recognise that it is a fantastic tool for creative thinking and writing. This is an invitation to test that idea out – why not stretch your writing muscles and take a few photos of something you keep close to you, write about it, tell the reader what it is, why you love it, where you got it from, where you keep it?

Have fun with the idea – let yourself explore the facts, feel free to insert some fiction. I made a cake that inspired a story (well a beginning of one) – if you have a great idea for an ending for that please feel free.

Here’s where you can see  the Publication page – if you need help doing it drop me an email – I’m no expert but am learning!

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how to make a 30 second video for The Story of Objects project – learn how on youtube

The Story of Objects playlist is to share 30 second video clips of people telling the Story of THEIR Objects.

We all own things that we keep with us as we travel through our lives – often little things that we anticipate we will keep forever. Sometimes we may be parted from them, and they may change ownership, for whatever reason.

Flow Contemporary Arts is doing some research into the stories of those objects with a view to developing a way of harvesting them.

But for now, Carolyn invites you to contribute the story of YOUR favourite object/s.

Watch the How To Create Your The Story Of Objects in 30 seconds video to find out how.

Be creative!!!!

When you’ve made your film, if you could put it in Dropbox and share the link, or send it to me by youtransfer or similar would be great…..email flowcontemporaryarts@gmail.com

I appreciate not everyone knows how to work with video fles – they are big and cannot be emailed easily. If you live local to me I can come and collect them on a drive, or even do your film for you – just get in touch.

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The Story of Objects – new research, partners needed, contact me to discuss

For the last year or so I have been developing a framework for a very special project, The Story of Objects.

It’s about orphaned objects, curating and an online repository. It’s social and cultural geography, art and genealogy.

Do you work in any of these fields? I’m seeking partners to make this happen…….

Would you like to have a confidential conversation about joining me on this?

If so, get in touch – there is a funding deadline looming…..

carolyn@flowprojects.org.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canal & River Trust, waterways, people, passion and museums

I attended the Canal & River Trust AGM on Friday in Birmingham’s beautiful new library. The Trust is only two years old, so very early days for them. Whilst their key business is about public engagement they have had a huge number of maintenance works to do as well. It is remarkable what they have achieved in this short time and there was a very positive feeling in the room. I’m very pleased I went because being surrounded by people with a passion for something makes life worthwhile.

Laurence Newman, Chair of the Museums & Attractions Partnership said: “Think about the outside of the museums, not just the inside”.

This was the first sentence that really took my attention – probably because whilst I work with Museums, I am very drawn by working beyond them too. That social history and landscape use is not only archive material but continues to be out there, in the streets, the architecture, in the fields and waterways.

Museums are not only about conservation, preservation and collection, but also about the future. Professor John Hume, giving his retiring address, commented that “we need to find a better term than heritage, it’s awful”. He also voiced disdain for the term ‘attractions’, declaring them to be rubbish. I couldn’t agree more, I thought John Hume was an inspiration. He was vociferous about the need to generate history, not just look back at the heritage.  “We’ve been living in the past…too romantic”. Everyone spoke passionately about his or her roles within in the Trust. John more than anyone was keen to keep the focus on the social history. The image below is of one of John’s slides, showing the protests about the possible closure of sections of the Grand Union Canal in 1960’s. I think this image is very reflective of the tensions in the room about how to move forward:

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The image of the 1960’s protesters floats above the orderly speakers table. Earlier this year there was another protest about the Grand Union Canal in Milton Keynes – which just shows how much people care about access these waterways. The view out to the city of Birmingham beyond is framed by the distinctive circular motifs of the New Library.

In the room we discussed the function of the canal and waterway network – past, present and future. Indeed Birmingham is built around the canal system – yet there is no Waterway Museum there. The Gloucester Waterways Museum is much loved, but is being crowded out by the Peel Development at Gloucester Quays. Someone mentioned it should relocate – but without the canal network it would be dislocated and stripped of meaning.

Time does not – cannot – stand still. The whole canal system is a museum – but it must also record and document current things, or it will have a huge legacy gap and be frozen in time. I love the way that the waterways are like arteries in the landscape – they carry things and people, connecting places together across time. Art projects could be used to join places up, by commissioning artists to explore each place and share their findings in other places.

Occasionally there were terms used that I questioned. There was talk about the Trust being ‘the experts’ and that visitors and the public are ‘customers’. So archiving knowledge is about sharing ‘their’ knowledge. But surely we should be thinking about collaborating with our membership, learning from them just as much as they learn from us? Living the Wikipedia principle both online and off. We are all the public. Defining people as experts and membership as ‘the public’ or ‘customers’ it sets up a mindset of there being a trading transaction, rather than sharing a genuine passion for the rivers and waterways.

Whilst the concept of the expert is, of course important, I’m not sure whether it is a useful way to bring people on board to support the Trust. Knowledge exchange, sharing learning and engendering generosity will help to feed the economic machine. I suspect that we are becoming immune to the hard-sell approach. Better to engage with enthusiasts and feed their passion as collaborators, rather than take a service provider role.

And that applies to the digitisation of the archives. The archives conserve everyday things that were made by, and belonged to, ordinary people. And living ordinary people can add to the knowledge about those things through storytelling. There was talk about educating and informing people – knowledge belongs to everyone, because everyone has a story to tell.

Artists can help in that process. And I hope that I can too. I thrive on these discussions and spend hours of my life considering new ways of thinking about them.