Visit Glos Waterways Museum, engage your analytical engine, hear an interplanetary receiver – opens Sat 28th Feb

DO YOU EVER WONDER WHAT ON EARTH ARTISTS DO IN MUSEUMS? VISIT THE WATERWAYS MUSEUM AND ENGAGE YOUR ANALYTICAL ENGINE, HEAR THE INTERPLANETARY RECEIVER AND FIND OUT

On Saturday 28th February The Waterways Museum in Gloucester launches the tour of the Miniature Museum of Museums, created by artists Tara Downs and Bart Sabel. They create automata, soundworks and interactive sculpture, engaging and enchanting audiences of all ages, evoking curiosity and wonder. Come and see An Interplanetary Receiver, An Analytical Engine (the brain), A Gramophone Planetarium and a Pianola Textile Coding Roll Machine – discover the ideas behind them and explore what makes innovation tick.

Thanks to Arts Council funding, Flow Contemporary Arts commissioned the artists to create a wonderful new Miniature Museum in response to the collections in three Gloucestershire Museums. The research and delivery of the project has been developed in partnership with the Holst Birthplace Museum (Cheltenham); the Museum in the Park (Stroud) and the Waterways Museum (Gloucester). A form of cabinet of curiosity, visitors will be able to touch and animate the artwork, which will merge knowledge, engineering and creative-thinking to release new ways of understanding the museum collections.

Friction Project
Friction Project

Flow Contemporary Arts’ first-ever project, in the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire with Simon Ryder

Are Community Libraries really more than books?

Absolutely!!

Artist in Residence Simon Ryder explores the art of blogging and teaches others to do it too. Join us to learn more at the following dates and times:

Mitcheldean Community Library

10.00-12.OOam

Monday 13th May, 3rd June and 17th June

Newnham Community Library

2.00-4.00pm

Monday 13th May, 3rd June and 17th June

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS LOCAL FUNDING AND IS FOR FOREST OF DEAN RESIDENTS AND LIBRARY USERS, BUT WE AIM TO PRODUCE CABINETS FURTHER AFIELD IN THE FUTURE!

Flow Contemporary Arts is delighted to have been awarded funding from Forest of Dean Local Action, part of the RDPE programme for England, to initiate the ‘Cabinet of Local Change’ project at two community libraries, during May and June this summer.

At the meetings we’ll tell you a bit more about what we’re doing, but more importantly, Simon would like to discover how changes in the nature world of the forest affect you. How did changes in the past affect your life? What current changes in the nature of the forest might affect you in the future? Your answers will help Simon understand more about the forest – the people that live here and what makes it unique.

What you tell Simon will inform the stories he tells about change – not in a book form, but online – as a blog.

And if you fancy having a go at blogging yourself, we’re here to help. We’ll go through the basics and explore how computers can add to the wonderful world of words that Libraries provide!

If you are in the Forest, please download and share poster:  Are Community Libraries really more than books

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Supported by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe investing in rural areas

my first Flow post – time to explore concepts and thoughts – starting with nesting

I usually post from my carolyn-black.co.uk website so this is a first for Flow Contemporary Arts.

I want to explore nesting – what does it mean to people? It’s one of those concepts that has a myriad of interpretations. Russian dolls. Birds. Mammals. Parents. Stacking things. Incubation. Settling.

Wiki offers a few ideas – some I have not seen before. Today I will start with the most obvious one, just to ease my mind into the theme:

A nest is a place of refuge to hold an animal’s eggs or provide a place to live or raise offspring. They are usually made of some organic material such as twigs, grass, and leaves; or may simply be a depression in the ground, or a hole in a tree, rock or building. Human-made materials, such as string, plastic, cloth, hair or paper, may also be used.

It’s easy to think about nesting today – working from home, in a warm house, heavy frost outside. Winter is a good time to think towards the spring, when nesting is easier to conceive of.

A search for the words nesting and flow together comes up with an intriguing article by Ben J. Rushbrook & Megan L. Head &
Ioanna Katsiadaki & Iain Barber:

Flow regime affects building behaviour and nest structure in sticklebacks

I have no knowledge of sticklebacks and their breeding habits. But some of the information in the article really makes me think, such as this:

Within flowing water treatments, we find that males select nesting sites with lower than average flow. We also find that nests built in flowing water are smaller and more streamlined than those built in still water.

Are people the same? I live by the River Severn, I find the constant ebb and flow of the tidal estuary calms me, excites me, I feel engaged with the landscape. My sister has moved to live by the sea.  We have no need to nest for breeding purposes, but we do appreciate streamlining our nests.

Flow and nesting are upmost in my mind. I welcome your thoughts on them too – literally, poetically, madly, deeply, metaphorically……..

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